Youthworx joined the Two Feet program as a well-established business with almost a decade behind them. Despite already having many successes, the enterprise was ready to re-jig it’s business model to ensure long-term sustainability.

Manager Jon Staley says, “It is very tough and at times lonely building an enterprise from scratch and sometimes you need to stand back and re-connect with the bigger picture of why you are doing it and also find new tools to move forward.”

 

“TDi is great at fostering collaborations and connecting individuals and organisations that can benefit from working together”

– Jon Staley, Youthworx

 

Two Feet was an opportunity for Youthworx to step back, find new tools, connect with other tackling similar questions and reconnect with the big picture.

The program contributed to the Youthworx team re-modelling their business infrastructure to create some new roles and re-shape their existing roles. Jon says, “I anticipate that this will help us grow significantly over the next three to five years”.

 

“From the moment I heard about it I Ioved the whole approach of TDI and the Two Feet Program… I love the mantra of doing good and making money and the philosophy that it’s ok to do both”

– Jon Staley

 

Youthworx is an enterprise based in Melbourne that trains and employs young people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness in creative and commercial film and radio production. The enterprise are providing highly engaging training as well as meaningful employment opportunities, creating sustainable career paths for the young people in their programs.

Two Feet is an accelerator for businesses at all stages of development, Jon found that the program helped to keep him hungry, engaged and connected with his business, and asking the right questions.


If you think Two Feet could be for you, email info@tdi.org.au

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